We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audience is coming from. To find out more, please read our privacy policy.

By choosing 'I Accept', you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies.

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audience is coming from. To find out more, please read our privacy policy.

By choosing 'I Accept', you consent to our use of cookies and other tracking technologies. Less

We use cookies and other tracking technologies... More

Login or register
to apply for this job!

Login or register
to save this job!

Login or register to start contributing with an article!

Login or register
to see more jobs from this company!

Login or register
to boost this post!

Show some love to the author of this blog by giving their post some rocket fuel 🚀.

Login or register to search for your ideal job!

Login or register to start working on this issue!

Engineers who find a new job through JavaScript Works average a 15% increase in salary 🚀

Blog hero image

Design Patterns in Haskell Part 1: The Strategy Pattern

Matt Noonan 15 March, 2018 | 12 min read

The Strategy Pattern

*Note: This is part one of a series of posts translating the Gang of Four design patterns for object-oriented languages into Haskell. It is intended to be an expansion of Edward Z. Yang's Design Patterns in Haskell, elaborating each pattern into its own post.*

For our first design pattern study, let's look at the Strategy Pattern. We'll motivate this pattern with a simple example that will be progressively refined, tweaked, and translated throughout this post.

Our example is centered around a function unique, with this specificaton: it takes a vector of ints, and tells you if all of the elements in that vector are distinct. A straightforward approach is to sort the vector, then check if any neighboring elements in the sorted version are equal.

But different sorting algorithms perform better or worse depending on what kind of data they are given. Even lowly bubblesort can beat the competition when the input is nearly sorted! So we may want to provide two or more variants of unique, making use of different sorting algorithms internally.

vector<int> bubblesort(vector<int> const&);

vector<int> mergesort(vector<int> const&);

bool unique_via_bubblesort(vector<int> const& input)
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    vector<int> sorted = bubblesort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

bool unique_via_mergesort(vector<int> const& input)
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    vector<int> sorted = mergesort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

At this point, I assume your DRY alarm bells are ringing loudly! We wrote down essentially the same function twice, making only a minor tweak between the two in order to change an implementation detail. Wasteful and distasteful!

From a high-level perspective, we have one unique algorithm, and two different strategies for implementing that algorithm: either via mergesort, or via bubblesort. The essence of the strategy pattern is to lift these implementation details out into a parameter of the algorithm. The algorithm becomes parameterized by the concrete implementation strategy!

In our running example, the strategy is a choice of sorting algorithm operating on vectors of ints. We can conceptualize the sorting strategy as a function that takes a vector<int> and produces a sorted vector<int>. Let's avoid repeating ourselves by making that function an argument to unique!

bool unique(vector<int> const& input,
            function<vector<int>(vector<int> const&)> sort)
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    vector<int> sorted = sort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

// Usage:
//
// unique(input, bubblesort);
// unique(input, mergesort);

Now the programmer has the option of passing different sorting strategies at different times, according to what they believe will perform optimially for a given input!

Strategies at compile-time

In some cases, we may prefer to do the strategy selection at compile time, by making unique into a function which is templated over a type that implements the strategy:

struct BubbleSort
{
    static vector<int> sort(vector<int> const&);
};

struct MergeSort
{
    static vector<int> sort(vector<int> const&);
};

template <typename SortStrategy>
bool unique ( vector<int> const& input )
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    vector<int> sorted = SortStrategy::sort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

// Usage:
//
// unique<MergeSort> ( input );
// unique<BubbleSort>( input );
//

The approach is similar to the runtime strategy pattern, except that we thread in the function as a template argument (or, in this case, we thread in a type that has access to the function we want). The main advantage here is that the compiler has full knowledge about what sorting algorithm is to be used at each call site, and can make more aggressive use of that information during optimization. On the other hand, the resulting executable will contain multiple implementations of unique, specialized for different types, and compile times will also suffer slightly.

To Haskell-land!

Now that we have explored the basic strategy pattern in C++, let's look at how to implement the same pattern in Haskell. It turns out the translation is very straightforward: we simply use a function of type Vector Int -> Vector Int for the strategy, where we would have used function<vector<int>(vector<int> const&)> in C++.

bubblesort :: Vector Int -> Vector Int
mergesort  :: Vector Int -> Vector Int

unique :: Vector Int -> (Vector Int -> Vector Int) -> Bool
unique input sort =
  if V.null input then True
                  else (V.and hasDistinctNeighbor)
  where
    sorted = sort input
    hasDistinctNeighbor = V.zipWith (/=) sorted (V.tail sorted)

-- Usage:
--
-- unique input bubblesort
-- unique input mergesort

"But wait," you say! "Is this a translation of the run-time strategy pattern, or the compile-time strategy pattern?"

Actually, it is both! GHC is clever enough to create specialized versions of unique when the strategy is known at compile time (analogous to the template compile-time strategy), while still creating non-specialized versions to enable run-time strategy selection. As you may guess, this can lead to both improved performance and larger binary sizes.

Sort all the things

At some point, we probably will want to work with vectors that hold things besides ints. In the run-time strategy example, we can abstract unique into a templated function:

template <typename T>
bool unique(vector<T> const& input,
            function<vector<T>(vector<T> const&)> sort)
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    auto sorted = sort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

This is not too bad, although we are giving up on the ability to change the item type at runtime. Usually, this is an acceptable compromise.

For the all-compile-time example, we'll need to introduce an item type to both the unique template, and to the BubbleSort and MergeSort concrete strategies:

template <typename T>
struct BubbleSort
{
    static vector<T> sort(vector<T> const&)
    { /* TODO */ }
};

template <typename T>
struct MergeSort
{
    static vector<T> sort(vector<T> const&)
    { /* TODO */ }
};

template <typename SortStrategy, typename T>
bool unique ( vector<T> const& input )
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    auto sorted = SortStrategy::sort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

// Usage:
//
// unique<MergeSort<int>, int>( input )
// unique<BubbleSort<int>, int>( input )
//

Unfortunately, this approach leaves us with some annoying repetition at the calls to unique. But never fear, just reach for your trusty template template parameters! We just need to tweak the definition of unique slightly:

template <template<typename> class SortStrategy, typename T>
bool unique ( vector<T> const& input )
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    auto sorted = SortStrategy<T>::sort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

// Usage:
//
// unique<MergeSort,  int>( input )
// unique<BubbleSort, int>( input )
//

There, much better! We'll get a compiler error if we try to instantiate T at a type with no operator==, but otherwise we seem to be in good shape.

How would we carry out that same generalization in the Haskell example? We simply replace Int with a type variable a! Well, almost; GHC has this complaint:

error:
    • No instance for (Eq a) arising from a use of ‘/=’
      Possible fix:
        add (Eq a) to the context of
          the type signature for:
            unique :: forall a. Vector a -> (Vector a -> Vector a) -> Bool

GHC sees that a can only be a type for which (/=) is defined, and this constraint is represented by placing Eq a into the context of the function's type. In addition to providing documentation about a function's requirements, this helps prevent some of the more mind-melting C++ template compilation errors where some type deep within a template instantiation forgot to implement a certain method or operator.

Our generalized Haskell example now looks like this:

unique :: Eq a => Vector a -> (Vector a -> Vector a) -> Bool
unique input sort =
  if V.null input then True
                  else (V.and hasDistinctNeighbor)
  where
    sorted = sort input
    hasDistinctNeighbor = V.zipWith (/=) sorted (V.tail sorted)

-- Usage:
--
-- unique input bubblesort
-- unique input mergesort

Note that (unlike the C++ template case) our usage examples remain nicely unchanged! Haskell will infer the type of a, so we do not need to explicitly specify it.

Closed strategies

It is not always desirable to allow the user to provide any concrete strategy they might dream up. In our running example, consider what would happen if the user passed in the "don't do anything" function as a sorting strategy:

template <typename T>
struct NotReallySort
{
    vector<T> sort(vector<T> const& input) {
        return input;
    }
};

// unique<NotReallySort, int> ( {2,1,2} ) == true !

It may be that there is only a finite, predetermined set of strategies that you want to expose. We may want to say "the user can select a bubblesort or mergesort strategy, but that's all the variation we want to allow."

Let's examine how to handle closed sets of strategies in the three scenarios: at runtime in C++, at compile-time C++, and in Haskell.

Closed strategies, C++ run time

Here, we model the different strategies using an enum or similar construction. I've used a bool to select between the two sorting algorithms, wrapped up inside of a SortStrategy class. We then expose static methods to construct different concrete strategies, and an operator() that executes the appropriate sort.


template <typename T>
class SortStrategy
{
public:
    static SortStrategy BubbleSort()
    { return SortStrategy(true); }

    static SortStrategy MergeSort()
    { return SortStrategy(false); }

    vector<T> operator()(vector<T> const& input) const {
        if (m_use_bubblesort) {
            // bubblesort here
        }
        else {
            // mergesort here
        }
    }
    
private:
    SortStrategy(bool use_bubblesort)
    : m_use_bubblesort(use_bubblesort) {}
    
    bool m_use_bubblesort;
};

template <typename T>
bool unique(vector<T> const& input,
            SortStrategy sort)
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    auto sorted = sort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

// Usage:
//
// unique(input, SortStrategy::BubbleSort());
// unique(input, SortStrategy::MergeSort());

There are plenty of other ways to get the same effect; how would you approach it?

One drawback to the approach I gave is that the different concrete strategies all are defined in one place (SortStrategy::operator()). Annoying.

Closed strategies, C++ compile time

For the compile-time case, we can use std::enable_if and std::is_same to ensure that only our blessed set of specializations can be used (taking a hit to readability in the process):

template <template<typename> class SortStrategy, typename T>
typename enable_if <
  is_same<SortStrategy<T>, BubbleSort<T>>::value ||
  is_same<SortStrategy<T>, MergeSort<T>>::value,
  bool>::type
unique ( vector<T> const& input )
{
    if (input.empty()) {
        return true;
    }
    auto sorted = SortStrategy<T>::sort(input);
    for (size_t i = 1; i < sorted.size(); ++i) {
        if (sorted[i - 1] == sorted[i]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

// Usage:
//
// unique<BubbleSort, int>(input);
// unique<MergeSort,  int>(input);

Attempting to instantiate unique<NotReallySort, int> results in a compilation failure, enforcing the closed-world model.

Closed-world strategies in Haskell

For Haskell, we can follow a path similar to the run-time C++ approach. First, we'll define a sum type that names the different strategies. Then we'll add a utility that turns a named strategy into a sorting function. The user will pass the name of a strategy to unique, which will select the appropriate concrete strategy.

data SortStrategy = BubbleSort | MergeSort

sortUsing :: Ord a => SortStrategy -> Vector a -> Vector a
sortUsing BubbleSort = _
sortUsing MergeSort  = _

unique :: Eq a => Vector a -> SortStrategy -> Bool
unique input strategy =
  if V.null input then True
                  else (V.and hasDistinctNeighbor)
  where
    sorted = sortUsing strategy input
    hasDistinctNeighbor = V.zipWith (/=) sorted (V.tail sorted)

-- Usage:
--
-- unique input BubbleSort
-- unique input MergeSort

Like the C++ runtime solution, this approach requires the allowed concrete strategies to be defined together in the sortUsing function.

For both the open- and closed-world strategy patterns above, the Haskell solutions are fairly straightforward. Interestingly, as the strategy pattern gets applied to more sophisticated situations, the Haskell examples remain essentially unchanged, while the C++ solutions either pick up artifacts of template metaprogramming or start to leak implementation details.

Now let's look at a different scenario, where the Haskell code has to do some extra work to keep up.

Facing the realWorld

What if we wanted to use a more... exotic sorting algorithm? For argument's sake, say we had a sorting strategy that operated by [making an HTTP request to Wolfram Alpha](https://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=sort+%5B+3,+1,+4,+1,+5+%5D). In C++, this would still look something like

vector<int> wolframsort(vector<int> const&);

In Haskell, we would expect that a function which performs I/O would have a type like this:

wolframsort :: Vector Int -> IO (Vector Int)

But if this is the case, then we are unable to pass wolframsort as the sorting strategy for unique! Why? Because unique expects a strategy with type Vector Int -> Vector Int, and we have a Vector Int -> IO (Vector Int)!

Let's look at three ways to resolve this conundrum: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

The bad

First, let's get something out of the way: please, please don't do this.

We can always pop the escape hatch and follow wolframsort by unsafePerformIO. Since unsafePerformIO can convert an IO (Vector a) to a Vector a, we might be tempted to try

unique input (unsafePerformIO . wolframsort)

But unsafePerformIO really is unsafe! Our sort might be run once, or many times, or not at all. We might end up caching a transient HTTP error and continue "seeing" it even when the Wolfram Alpha server is back up. The timing of when the sort will run is unclear. Everything has become unpredictable and suspicious. If you write this code, there will inevitably be gnashing of teeth and rending of garments (yours). Let's move on.

The ugly

Ok, we're going to keep ourselves honest and try another approach. This time, let's consider making a second version of unique, creatively called uniqueIO, like this:

uniqueIO :: Eq a
         => Vector a
         -> (Vector a -> IO (Vector a))
         -> IO Bool
         
uniqueIO input sort =
  if V.null input then return True
                  else check
  where
    check = do
      sorted <- sort input
      let hasDistinctNeighbor = V.zipWith (/=) sorted (V.tail sorted)
      return (V.and hasDistinctNeighbor)

-- Usage:
--
-- do
--    input <- readLn
--    is_unique <- uniqueIO input wolframsort
--    putStrLn ("Your list "
--              ++ (if is_unique then "does not" else "does")
--              ++ " have repeats.")

This works fine, and actually remains fairly close to the pure unique function we began with. The only place where I/O is actually performed is in the line sorted <- sort input where our impure sorting strategy is executed, and the result is given the name sorted.

But since we have come this far, can we do even better?

The good

Finally, we may notice when implementing uniqueIO that we aren't really using anything IO-ish, except for the function that the user handed us. That suggests an easy generalization, where we allow the user to provide us with a sorting strategy that works in whatever monad they please:

uniqueM :: (Eq a, Monad m)
        => Vector a
        -> (Vector a -> m (Vector a))
        -> m Bool
            
uniqueM input sort =
  if V.null input then return True
                  else check
  where
    check = do
      sorted <- sort input
      let hasDistinctNeighbor = V.zipWith (/=) sorted (V.tail sorted)
      return (V.and hasDistinctNeighbor)

Does the body of uniqueM look familiar? It is exactly the same body we used to implement uniqueIO! The only thing we needed to do was loosen up the type of uniqueIO a bit, replacing IO with an arbitrary monad m.

Now we can check for uniqueness of vectors that contain any type that supports equality, and carry out the computation in any monad the user pleases!

If we want to WolframSort, we can do it!

λ> :type uniqueM items wolframsort
uniqueM items wolframsort :: IO Bool

What else can we do with this newfound power? We can run randomized sorting algorithms, using the Rand monad. For example, we could use the Bogosort joke-algorithm: randomly shuffle the list and check if the result is sorted yet!

bogosort :: Ord a => Vector a -> Rand (Vector a)
bogosort = _

λ> :type uniqueM items bogosort
uniqueM items bogosort :: Rand Bool

Despite how it naturally reads, this isn't saying that uniqueM items bogosort will give us a random Bool. It means that we'll get a Bool, and along the way we will be making use of some random process. In fact, uniqueM items bogosort will always return the same result as unique items bubblesort, though the runtime will be randomized (and terrible!)

We can even recover the original, non-monadic version of unique, using the Identity monad:

unique :: Eq a => Vector a -> (Vector a -> Vector a) -> Bool
unique input sort = runIdentity (uniqueM input (pure . sort))

A hidden bonus

We have even empowered the user to invent use-cases that we may not have anticipated. For example, suppose the user wanted to sort vectors of IEEE double-precision floating-point numbers. These are mostly ordered, with a notable exception: [NaN cannot be reasonably compared to other values](https://randomascii.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/comparing-floating-point-numbers-2012-edition/) (not even other NaNs!). So the user may want to give a sorting strategy of the form

ieeesort :: Vector Double -> Maybe (Vector Double)
ieeesort v = if V.any isNaN v
             then Nothing
             else Just (sort v)

that sorts its input when there are no NaNs involved, or yields Nothing otherwise. Our generalized uniqueM handles this unexpected use-case just fine!

λ> :type \input -> uniqueM input ieeesort
\input -> uniqueM input ieeesort :: Vector Double -> Maybe Bool

λ> uniqueM (V.fromList [1, 2, 3]) ieeesort
Just True

λ> uniqueM (V.fromList [1, 2, 2]) ieeesort
Just False

λ> uniqueM (V.fromList [1, 0/0, 2]) ieeesort
Nothing

An apparent weakness has turned into a strength: instead of uniqueM being a burden to bear when the user wants to have an IO-based storing strategy, we have found a way to let the user select a strategy that involves an arbitrary computational context. In other words, the user now has access to an unexpectedly rich and expressive selection of strategies, without any further changes to the implementation of uniqueM!

Summary

The strategy pattern decouples an algorithm from some of its implementation details, allowing the programmer to select those details at runtime or at compile time as they see fit.

To the extent that "implementation details" can be understood to merely be program fragments, these details can simply be passed in to the algorithm as functions. In both Haskell and in modern C++, this function-passing encoding is simple and effective. In the case of Haskell, we can go even further to generalize the computational context of the strategy, as in uniqueM. Aggressive inlining and first-class polymorphism allow Haskell to use identical or mostly-identical code both for run-time and for compile-time variants of the strategy pattern.

Originally published on storm-country.com

    Static analysis
    Mathematics
    Reverse engineering
    C++
    Haskell
    Python
    Machine code
    x86
    ARM

Related Issues

viebel / klipse-clj
viebel / klipse-clj
  • Open
  • 0
  • 0
  • Intermediate
  • Clojure
viebel / klipse
  • Open
  • 0
  • 0
  • Intermediate
  • Clojure
viebel / klipse
  • 1
  • 0
  • Intermediate
  • Clojure
viebel / klipse
  • Started
  • 0
  • 1
  • Intermediate
  • Clojure
  • $80
viebel / klipse
  • Open
  • 0
  • 0
  • Advanced
  • Clojure
  • $80
viebel / klipse
  • Started
  • 0
  • 2
  • Advanced
  • Clojure
  • $180
viebel / klipse
  • Started
  • 0
  • 1
  • Intermediate
  • Clojure
viebel / klipse
  • 1
  • 1
  • Advanced
  • Clojure
  • $300

Get hired!

Sign up now and apply for roles at companies that interest you.

Engineers who find a new job through JavaScript Works average a 15% increase in salary.

Start with GitHubStart with Stack OverflowStart with Email